In Memoriam: Reading One of Tom Raworth’s Last Poems

Poetry News
By Harriet Staff
Martin Corless-Smith remembers Tom Raworth at Tarpaulin Sky. He also looks at Raworth’s “observing ‘i’” in what might be his last poem, “Previs.” Corless-Smith had permission to bring it out as a chapbook, he says, and points out that Raworth also published it on his blog. It is dedicated to Sean Bonney. He reads the poem closely:

Typical of Raworth’s work, the first line signals a game that we sense will unfold along with the poem. The ordinary discourse of I/you is subverted, diverted, inverted by the last word “me.” We expect either a proper noun or a pronoun indicating otherness. Here the discourse is with the self, which either means it is involuted, or that the self is made of disparate parts. The suggestion is perhaps glib, but more obviously self-conscious about identity, and the inwardness of poetic discourse. It’s self-deprecating at the same time as it is deftly suggestive of the opacity of language, and the “over-thereness” of being. We can see it as a flippant twist, or as loaded with meaning. That’s part of the issue with an “i” speaking to a “you.” The “me” of the reader really has the task of registering tone and intention from the signaled clues. Here they are not so much ambiguous as simultaneously supportive of exclusive meanings. That’s Raworth. Take either version as the “right” answer and you miss the point. We tend to imagine that poems want to impart a serious truth, but often they are really about “being” read, and language is alive as long as we keep reading it to find out what is said. We hardly listen to ordinary discourse, because we don’t feel we need to. But here we perk up. We pay attention.

Find all of “The Observing ‘i’ in Raworth’s poetry and all that jazz” at Tarpaulin Sky.
Portrait of Tom Raworth by Aldo Agnelli. Used with permission.

Tags: Aldo Agnelli, Martin Corless-Smith, Tarpaulin Sky, Tom Raworth Posted in Poetry News on Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 by Harriet Staff.

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Frances Richard Reviews The Work-Shy for 4Columns

Poetry News
By Harriet Staff
At 4Columns, Frances Richard reviews The Work-Shy (Blunt Research Group, Wesleyan University Press, 2017). “The Work-Shy is a book of spare lyric poems interspersed with a few pencil drawings, archival documents, and photographs reproduced in black and white. Yet these simple forms conduct us into a complex terrain, one shaped by holes: the fissures in authorship; the aporiae of history; the rift between word and image; the hollowing-out of genuine social goods like diagnosis, assistance, collectivity, productivity.”

Looking for its author, you’ll find: “BLUNT RESEARCH GROUP is a nameless constellation of poets, artists, and scholars from diverse backgrounds.” Richard considers this:

Scanning the “Sources” listed at the book’s end, as well as the copyright, one deduces that personnel in this group include historian Miroslava Chávez-García and poet Daniel Tiffany, among others. Yet the “nameless constellation” is a more interesting author-position to attach to The Work-Shy. For, in its juxtaposing of subjects’ and authors’ anonymities, the project asks: What rule does one obey, or what self does one create, by having a name or occupation (“scholar,” “poet”)? What kind of blunt instrument is the sifting of archives, and what kind of work is being an artist—or a ward of the state? Are both “ungovernable” outcasts from orderly processes of capital? Or does the imagination of such kinship further obscure the latter’s particularity, already imperiled by their historically enforced silence or “shyness”?
Each of the collaged poems in “Lost Privilege Company” is titled with the name of the teenager whose words it borrows: Frankie, Cornelius, Pedro, Uriah, Javier. Most of the kids were boys. They were aged twelve to seventeen, disproportionately Chicano and African American, but also Native American, white, and of mixed race. Serious and suspicious, they look out from the “mirror portraits” reproduced in The Work-Shy—administrative documentary images in which sitters were photographed beside a mirror, so that both sides of their faces can be seen.
Blunt Research Group italicizes the teens’ voices and leaves case notes from the institutional researchers in plain type, emphasizing the domination of the former by the latter. Thus the poem titled for Jesus, in its entirety:

refused to talk

and was sent to “thaw out”

sent to Lost Privilege Company

for mauling and kissing another boy used

to teach younger boys to steal

degenerate
one would almost call him

playing bandit
The poems are hard to excerpt—a sign of their allusive integrity.

Read the full review at 4Columns.

Tags: 4Columns, Blunt Research Group, Frances Richard, Wesleyan University Press Posted in Poetry News on Monday, February 13th, 2017 by Harriet Staff.

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Filmmaker Ebrahim Golestan Discusses Poet Forough Farrokhzad

Poetry News
By Harriet Staff
Iranian filmmaker Ebrahim Golestan tells the Guardian about his romantic connection with poet Forough Farrokhzad. Known as one of the most significant voices in contemporary Iranian poetry, Farrokhzad died in a car accident in 1967, at the age of 32. Golestan had not previously discussed his relationship to Farrokhzad. Saeed Kamali Dehghan writes more at the Guardian:

Mehdi Jami, who has written extensively about Farrokhzad’s influence on Persian literature, said the film-maker made a significant impact on her writing, particularly in introducing her to modern literary movements in the west. “If you want to name one person that had the most influence on Forough, that’s undoubtedly Golestan. They met each other at the right moment,” Jami said.
“In every culture you have cultural icons, like Shakespeare in Britain. Farrokhzad was like that for contemporary Iran, someone who formed the identity of our contemporariness,” Jami added. “She wrote in a simple and intimate way. She was not fake, nor was her poetry … She was the last prophet of truth-telling that our country has seen.”
Mohammad Reza Shafiei Kadkani, Iran’s most famous living poet, told the Guardian from Tehran that she was “truly modern”, without talking about modernism directly in her poetry. “She was very natural. She was the epitome of a real poet in her own time,” he said. “She had no masks, that’s why today we still read her, and in future we will read her, too.”
Golestan said two friends had introduced him to Farrokhzad in the late 1950s when she was looking for a job. At the time he was running a well-known studio in Darrous, an affluent area in northern Tehran. He left Iran a few years after Farrokhzad’s death over his dismay at the political atmosphere under the Shah, and has lived in Sussex since 1975. He has never returned to his home country.

Read on at the Guardian.

Tags: Ebrahim Golestan, Forough Farrokhzad, Saeed Kamali Dehghan, The Guardian Posted in Poetry News on Monday, February 13th, 2017 by Harriet Staff.

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage by Deepak Singh

In this moving and insightful work, Deepak Singh chronicles his downward mobility as an immigrant to a small town in Virginia. Armed with an MBA from India, Singh can get only a minimum-wage job in an electronics store. Every day he confronts unfamiliar American mores, from strange idioms to deeply entrenched racism. Telling stories through the unique lens of an initially credulous outsider who is “fresh off the plane,” Singh learns about the struggles of his colleagues: Ron, a middle-aged African-American man trying to keep his life intact despite health concerns; Jackie, a young African-American woman diligently attending school after work; and Cindy, whose matter-of-fact attitude helps Deepak adapt to his job and his new life.  How May I Help You? is an incisive take on life in the United States and a reminder that the stories of low-wage employees can bring candor and humanity to debates about work, race, and immigration.

Deepak Singh is a writer, radio producer, and journalist. He is a frequent contributor to PRI’s The World and has written for The New York Times, NPR, The Boston Globe and The Atlantic.

“An interesting look at a puzzling society—ours—from the point of view of a sympathetic but not uncritical outsider.”
—Kirkus Reviews
“With careful candor and clarity, [Deepak Singh] shows the challenges facing new immigrants and the effort it takes to surmount them.”—Booklist
“Deepak Singh shares his incredible stories of learning, feeling, beauty, work, friendship, and marriage. It is at once deeply personal and specific, while also resonating with fellow humans’ similar struggles across the globe.”—Dr. Susan D. Blum, author of Lies That Bind: Chinese Truth, Other Truths
“I devoured Deepak Singh’s memoir at home, at work, on the subway and on the streets of New York. It’s funny, eye-opening, and deeply human in its regard for working-class Americans and for all people who struggle to make ends meet. If Barbara Ehrenreich had been born in India, Nickel and Dimed might’ve looked a lot like this.” —Arun Venugopal, WNYC
“Deepak Singh reanimates the fears, joys, bafflements, and general vertigo of those first few months after immigrating to the United States. With humor and pathos in equal measure, Singh shows us how difficult it is to work at the most insecure levels of American society.” —Siva Vaidhyanathan, University of Virginia

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Jim Joseph Foundation Awards $8 Million Grant to Onward Israel

February 14, 2017

The Jim Joseph Foundation has announced an $8 million grant to Onward Israel in support of the New York City-based organization’s efforts to expand its Israel immersion and Jewish education programs.

The grant will support Onward Israel’s efforts to increase the number of Birthright Israel and teen program alumni who return to Israel for internships, service learning and academic opportunities, and fellowships. Over the next year, the organization hopes to increase the number of participants it engages from fifteen hundred to twenty-two hundred in eleven different theme-based experiences — up from four in 2015 — including entrepreneurship and innovation; education and social services; science, technology and health; policy and government; and sports, hospitality, and business.
Last year, Onward launched several initiatives to deepen Jewish learning experiences, including weekend “breakout seminars” in which participants choose options such as leadership, geopolitics and diplomacy, spirituality, and social change and forge relationships with participants from the full range of onward Israel programs; options for additional enrichment through the Onward Israel “miniversity”; an option for academic credit through an internship enhancement course; a new option that provides each participant with a four-day seminar on contemporary Israeli society and allows for reflection on the participants’ Jewish identity; and, in partnership with Ulpan Or, a pre-program online Hebrew learning opportunity.
“Onward Israel is designed to meet the interests of today’s young adults who seek international resumé-building experiences,” said Onward Israel co-founder and board chair David Shapira. “Onward Israel is becoming one of the most attractive and fastest growing deep-impact programs in the Jewish world. This investment by the Jim Joseph Foundation will enable Onward Israel to maintain this rapid growth, while continuing to thoughtfully invest in educational content that makes the program both attractive and effective.”

Location: Israel; New York City

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

RWJF Names Richard Besser as New President and CEO

February 14, 2017

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has named Richard Besser, former acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as its new president and CEO.

Besser will succeed Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, who announced in September her intention to step down after leading the $10 billion foundation for fourteen years. The first woman and first African American to head the nation’s largest philanthropy devoted to health, Lavizzo-Mourey advanced RWJF’s programmatic efforts in important areas, including combating childhood obesity, to which the foundation pledged $500 million over ten years in 2015; promoting health equity; expanding health coverage; and building a Culture of Health in America.
Currently a professor of pediatrics at Columbia University, a distinguished visiting fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health, and chief health and medical editor at ABC News, Besser began his career in 1991 in the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service before serving for five years as pediatric residency director at the University of California, San Diego while also working for the county health department on the control of pediatric tuberculosis. Returning to the CDC in 1998 as an infectious disease epidemiologist, he later served as director of the agency’s Coordinating Office for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response unit and, for a short period in 2009, as acting director of the CDC itself.
Lavizzo-Mourey will continue to serve as the foundation’s president and CEO until Besser takes over sometime in April.
“It is truly an honor to be selected to lead RWJF, a foundation so deeply committed to building a Culture of Health in this country,” said Besser. “Working to improve the health and well-being of all Americans is a high calling. Doing it here, with an organization of such stature and credibility, will be a great honor and privilege.”
“Risa leaves big shoes to fill,” said RWJF board chair Roger Fine. “She has been a remarkable leader and visionary. Richard Besser will bring his own wisdom and energy to our work. I’m confident that he will continue the strong, inspired leadership to which we have grown so accustomed.”

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Study Calls for Giving Youth a Voice in Juvenile Justice Reform

February 14, 2017

Juvenile justice reform efforts should more directly engage youth who have had first-hand experience of the juvenile justice system and whose experience could help shape more effective prevention and diversion programs, a report from the Pittsburgh Foundation argues.

Based on discussion groups conducted with more than fifty youth about their experiences with school suspensions and the juvenile justice system in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, the report, A Qualitative Study of Youth and the Juvenile Justice System: A 100 Percent Pittsburgh Pilot Project (31 pages, PDF), highlights the importance of paying attention to the actual experiences of youth and the factors that led to their involvement with the system. The latter include racial and gender disparities in how youth are treated by the juvenile justice system; the prevalence of physical and sexual abuse in their homes, communities, and schools; disciplinary practices that criminalize common youth behaviors and label them as “delinquents”; lack of access to supportive adults and mental health services; structural racism that promotes negative self-images among youth of color; and policies and practices that often punish youth for circumstances beyond their control.
In addition to ensuring that youth have a seat at the table along with human services staff, law-enforcement authorities, and school officials, the study calls for greater focus on addressing disproportionate involvement with the juvenile justice system among youth of color, especially girls; supporting efforts aimed at reforming school culture, curricula, and disciplinary policies, including restorative justice programs; supporting prevention and diversion initiatives; and increasing access to caring adults and mental health services. The report also recommends engaging youth as advocates and agents of change among their peers; supporting reform of court-related fees and restitution systems; and funding interdisciplinary training opportunities.
“If we mean to put an end to the school-to-prison pipeline, reform efforts must include listening to youth and involving them fundamentally in shaping programs and policy actions,” said Pittsburgh Foundation president and CEO Maxwell King. “The most valuable insights come from young people willing to offer unflinching descriptions of their lives against a backdrop of poverty and the juvenile justice system.”

Location: Allegheny County; Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Lenfest Institute, Knight Award $4.8 Million for Digital News Project

February 14, 2017

The Lenfest Institute for Journalism, in partnership with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, has announced grants totaling $4.8 million over three years to the School of Media and Communication at Temple University to accelerate the shift to digital at news organizations across the country.

Grants of $3.3 million from Knight and $1.5 million from Lenfest will enable the university to expand the Knight-Temple Table Stakes project, which was launched in October 2015 to help metropolitan daily news organizations accelerate their transition from print to digital and evolve their practices so as to reach new audiences and better engage readers and their communities. Through the project, more than fifty leaders from the Dallas Morning News, the Miami Herald, the Minneapolis Star Tribune, and the Philadelphia Media Network, which owns the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, spent a year focused on creating plans to advance their digital transformations.
The new funding will be used to expand the project, to be renamed the Knight-Lenfest Newsroom Initiative, to twelve additional newsrooms, including the Seattle Times, Bay Area News Group (Digital First Media), Houston Chronicle (Hearst), and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Gannett).
The second phase of the initiative also will include a collaboration with the Center for Innovation & Sustainability in Local Media at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Media and Journalism, leveraging grants awarded in 2015 of $3 million from Knight and $1 million from the UNC Office of the Provost. Working with project leadership, the center will work to develop an approach to lesson dissemination focused on local and regional news organizations. To that end, it will work with eight to twelve media organizations in North Carolina, including newspapers, radio and television stations, and digital startups, to create a network of sustainable news outlets that can tackle and surmount digital-age challenges. In addition, the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Florida, will receive $880,000 in support of its efforts to assist newsrooms across the country with their digital and cultural transformations.
“We are honored and delighted by the new Knight-Lenfest partnership. The newsroom initiative has enjoyed impressive and measurable success in helping transform the news business in Philadelphia, Dallas, Minneapolis, and Miami,” said Lenfest Institute executive and CEO Jim Friedlich. “Never have the stakes for local news been higher, or the need for greater investment and expertise more apparent.”

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

Eye on the Cure

© 2017 Foundation Fighting Blindness, All Rights Reserved.
7168 Columbia Gateway Drive, Suite 100, Columbia, MD 21046 | (800) 683-5555

En Español Sign Up Contact Us | Careers | Media | Accessibility Tools | Privacy Policy | Site Map

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you

INVITE: “Wolf Conservation in Colorado: Past, Present, and Future” Symposium, Featuring Live Wolves, Film Screening and Panel Discussion

EMBARGOED UNTIL 6:00 PM MT ON FEB. 15, 2017
Contact:

Ryan Wilbur; (720) 943-0471; rwilbur@defenders.org
Leigh Anne Tiffany; (202) 772-0259; ltiffany@defenders.org
Delia Malone; Sierra Club; delia.malone@rmc.sierraclub.org
Hillary Larson; Sierra Club; hillary.larson@sierraclub.org
MEDIA ADVISORY
INVITE: “Wolf Conservation in Colorado: Past, Present, and Future” Symposium, Featuring Live Wolves, Film Screening and Panel Discussion
Fort Collins, Colo. (Feb. 13, 2017) – Defenders of Wildlife, the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the Sierra Club and W.O.L.F. Sanctuary will hold a wolf educational event at the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery on Feb. 15, 2017.
What: “Wolf Conservation in Colorado: Past, Present, and Future” Symposium
When: Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017 at 6:00 pm MT
·         6:00-7:00 pm: “Meet-and-Greet” with ambassador wolves from Bellvue, Colorado’s W.O.L.F. Sanctuary
·         7:00-8:00 pm: Screening of the documentary A Season of Predators, which highlights successful and creative approaches other Western states have taken to reduce human-predator conflict
·         8:00-9:00 pm: Panel discussion and Q&A on wolf conservation in Colorado.
Where: Museum of Discovery, Fort Collins, Colo.
Who: Moderated by Ryan Wilbur, Defenders of Wildlife’s Rockies and Plains Representative, the panel is composed of Avery Shawler, Project Coordinator for the Wood River Wolf Project in wolf-occupied Blaine County, Idaho; Dr. Barry Noon, wildlife biologist at Colorado State University; Jose Miranda, manager of a cattle ranch on Colorado’s Western Slope; and Sheppard Hobgood, an elk hunter from southern Colorado.
Why: In 1945, the last wolf in Colorado was killed, the culmination of a state-wide campaign to eradicate predators through shooting, trapping and poisoning. Since then, the loss of this top predator has altered our state’s flora and fauna. For example, the absence of wolves in Rocky Mountain National Park allows elk to browse extensively on vegetation along rivers and streams, which has led to erosion and degradation of habitat for a variety of birds and aquatic species. Restoring wolves to Colorado would restore our state’s natural balance. Panelists from various perspectives will discuss the importance, benefits and challenges of gray wolf conservation in Colorado.
Seating is limited and reservations are required. Please contact Caitlin Cattelino at 720-943-0452 or ccattelino@defenders.org for more information and to reserve your spot.
###
 
Defenders of Wildlife is dedicated to the protection of all native animals and plants in their natural communities. With more than 1.2 million members and activists, Defenders of Wildlife is a leading advocate for innovative solutions to safeguard our wildlife heritage for generations to come. For more information, visit www.defenders.org and follow us on Twitter @DefendersNews.

Related Items:attorney, car insurance, donate, foundation, insurance, loan, mortgage, News, news release service, press release, pressemelding, Universität, University

Recommended for you